When, Where & How to Get Vaccine
Title
Where is a list of all the different vaccination sites in Maryland?
Content

The following website will help you locate all vaccine clinics near you: https://coronavirus.maryland.gov/pages/vaccine.

A list of upcoming Health Department vaccine clinics can be found here: vaccine.howardcountymd.gov.

All Marylanders ages 6 months and older are eligible for vaccine at all state vaccination sites (depending on vaccine supply). Appointments are still required at some vaccine locations.

Title
Who is eligible for vaccine in Howard County?
Content
  1. All Marylanders ages 6 months and older are eligible for vaccine at any state vaccination site (depending on vaccine supply).

  2. The Health Department typically offers all three vaccines at its clinics. Visit vaccine.howardcountymd.gov to confirm the vaccine supply at a Health Department clinic.

  3. Appointments are still required at some vaccination sites.

Title
How can I pre-register for vaccine with the Health Department?
Content
  1. An updated list of vaccine clinics is posted on our website weekly and can be found here: vaccine.howardcountymd.gov.

  2. Appointments are encouraged, but many vaccine clinics also offer walk-up vaccinations (while supplies last).

Title
Can someone help me register? I am unable to access a computer.
Content
  1. Somone can complete the pre-registration survey for you and use their email address to help monitor communications about upcoming vaccination clinics and appointment instructions. 

  1. You can also call 410-313-6284 for assistance completing the Howard County Health Department survey and call 855-MD-GoVAX (855-634-6829) for assistance from the state of Maryland. 

Title
Can my caregiver come with me to get vaccinated?
Content

When you make a vaccine appointment, someone can come with you to help you. They would also be able to receive vaccine, if eligible.

Title
Can I get vaccine from my healthcare provider or the hospital?
Content

Hospitals and some healthcare providers have vaccine available for patients. You should visit the website or call your healthcare providers (or the hospital where you are a patient) to determine their vaccine availability and how to make an appointment.

Title
If I live in Howard County do I have to get vaccinated here?
Content
  1. Each vaccination site in the State has different procedures for vaccine administration. You should contact the vaccine site directly to determine eligibility requirements.

  2. Anyone interested in and eligible to receive vaccine is encouraged to contact multiple vaccination sites for the best chance to secure a vaccine appointment. 

  3. The Howard County Health Department provides vaccine to anyone eligible to receive vaccine based on their age.

Title
Where can I find information in languages other than English?
Content

The following two website have some information available in alternative languages:  https://covidlink.maryland.gov/content/vaccine/#maryland has information in English, Spanish, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, French, Creole and Korean.

Title
Which vaccine type should I receive?
Content

Each of the vaccines authorized for use by the FDA have been proven to be safe and effective at preventing serious illness, hospitalization and death from COVID-19. 

UPDATE 5/5/2022: The FDA Limits Use of Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine to Certain Individuals. Read the full news release here.

Title
Does the Health Department provide walk-up vaccine appointments?
Content

Some Health Department clinics have begun to offer walk-up appointments. Please check our website vaccine.howardcountymd.gov to confirm an appointment is not required.

Updated clinics are posted weekly. Please continue to check our vaccine page for new appointment availability.

Title
What can I do if I missed my second vaccine appointment?
Content

If you missed your second scheduled Moderna vaccine appointment, call 410-313-6284 or email [email protected] to schedule a new appointment.

You can also visit any Health Department walk-up vaccine clinic to receive your second dose if you have missed your scheduled second dose Moderna appointment.

Title
How can I confirm my second dose appointment?
Content

After completing your on-site registration for your second vaccine dose, you will receive a confirmation email from "Vaccination Clinics " with the details of your second dose appointment. You will receive a reminder email 24 hours before your second dose appointment from the same email address. If you have received this message, your second dose is confirmed and you do not need to do anything else. If you have not received the confirmation message, please check your spam folder. If you cannot locate your second dose appointment confirmation, you can call us at 410-313-6284 or email [email protected].

Information for Immigrants
Title
Can I get a vaccine if I’m undocumented?
Content

Yes, HCHD COVID-19 vaccination clinics do NOT collect information about immigration status. We do NOT share personal participant information with immigration authorities.

Content

No, you can get a vaccine even if you are undocumented. HCHD COVID-19 vaccination clinics do NOT collect information about immigration status. We do NOT share personal participant information with immigration authorities.

Title
What documents do I need to bring with me for my vaccine appointment?
Content

Photo ID that shows your birthdate – Driver’s license, passport, etc.
Proof of Howard county address – utility bill, credit card statement, medical bill, etc.

Title
Why do I need to bring proof of ID and address to my vaccine appointment?
Content

This documentation is used to verify identity and where you live to confirm vaccine eligibility. HCHD COVID-19 vaccination clinics do NOT collect information about immigration status. We do NOT share personal participant information with immigration authorities. The Health Department does not maintain possession of this information.

Title
Is getting the vaccine part of public charge? Or will getting my vaccine affect my immigration process?
Content

No, COVID-19 testing, treatment and vaccination are NOT part of Public Charge. ("Public Charge" means any immigrant who receives one or more public benefits for more than 12 months total within a 36-month period.) HCHD COVID-19 vaccination clinics do NOT collect information about immigration status. They do NOT share personal participant information with immigration authorities.

Booster Shots
Title
Who is eligible for a Booster Shot?
Content

The FDA and CDC authorized booster shots of the Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson vaccines for all individuals age 18 and older (age 5 for Pfizer). Please review the following information.

  • If you received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, you are eligible for any vaccine booster shot, if you are 18 years of age or older, two months following your initial vaccination.
  • If you received the Moderna vaccine, you are eligible for the booster shot if you are 18 years of age or older, five months after your final vaccination. 
  • If you received the Pfizer vaccine, you are eligible for the booster shot if you are 5 years of age or older, five months after your final vaccination. **Pfizer is the only vaccine approved for adolescents ages 5-17, including booster shots.**
Title
I am eligible for a Booster Shot. Where can I get one?
Content

Individuals can go to any vaccination site. This includes: state vaccination sites, local health departments, pharmacies, retail stores, and other healthcare providers. You can find a list of Health Department clinics here.

Though no proof or doctor's note will be required at HCHD-run clinics, individuals will be asked to self-attest that they are eligible for a booster shot. Documentation of your previous vaccine series will be required. Either bring your vaccine card or verify your vaccine information has been accurately recorded in Immunet, the State of Maryland Immunization database. Individuals should talk to their healthcare provider about their specific situation, and whether getting an additional dose is appropriate for them.

Title
What Immunocompromised Individuals are Eligible for a Third Vaccine Dose?
Content

Currently, CDC is recommending that moderately to severely immunocompromised people receive an additional dose. This includes people who have:

  • Been receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood
  • Received an organ transplant and are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
  • Received a stem cell transplant within the last 2 years or are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
  • Moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (such as DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome)
  • Advanced or untreated HIV infection
  • Active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that may suppress your immune response

People should talk to their healthcare provider about their medical condition, and whether getting an additional dose is appropriate for them.

CDC Vaccine Recommendations for Immunocompromised People

Title
Who is Eligible for a 4th Vaccine Dose?
Content

Moderately and severely immunocompromised people aged ≥18 years who completed an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine primary series and received an additional mRNA vaccine dose may receive a single COVID-19 booster dose (Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Janssen) at least 6 months after completing their third mRNA vaccine dose. In such situations, people who are moderately and severely immunocompromised may receive a total of four COVID-19 vaccine doses. Click here for more information.

Title
Where can I get an additional dose if I am moderately to severely immunocompromised?
Content

First, people should talk to their healthcare provider about their medical condition, and whether getting an additional dose is appropriate for them.

Individuals can go to any vaccination sites offering the mRNA vaccine they received for their first two doses. This includes: state vaccination sites, local health departments, pharmacies, retail stores, and other healthcare providers. You can find a list of Health Department clinics here.

Title
What vaccine type should I get for my booster shot/3rd dose
Content

There are now booster recommendations for all three available COVID-19 vaccines in the United States. Eligible individuals may choose which vaccine they receive as a booster dose. Some people may have a preference for the vaccine type that they originally received and others may prefer to get a different booster. CDC’s recommendations now allow for this type of mix and match dosing for booster shots.

UPDATE 12/16/2021: The CDC has updated its recommendations, expressing a clinical preference for individuals to receive an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine over Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine. Read the full media statement here.

Title
If I got the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, should I get an additional dose?
Content

If you received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, you are eligible for any vaccine booster shot, if you are 18 years of age or older, two months following your initial vaccination.

Title
How long after my initial COVID-19 vaccines can I get an additional dose?
Content

The CDC and FDA have authorized a booster shot of the Pfizer vaccine five months after the initial vaccine series and the Moderna vaccine six months after the initial vaccine series. Individuals who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine are eligible for a booster shot two months after their initial vaccine dose.

Exception: CDC recommends the additional dose of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine be administered to immunocompromised people at least four weeks after a second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines.

Title
What are the risks of receiving an additional vaccine dose?
Content

There is limited information about the risks of receiving an additional dose of vaccine, and the safety, efficacy, and benefit of additional doses of COVID-19 vaccine in immunocompromised people continues to be evaluated. So far, reactions reported after the third mRNA dose were similar to that of the two-dose series: fatigue and pain at injection site were the most commonly reported side effects, and overall, most symptoms were mild to moderate.

Title
I got the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, and I would now like to receive the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine. What should I do?
Content

If you received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, you are eligible for any vaccine booster shot, if you are 18 years of age or older, two months following your initial vaccination.

Title
Will In-Home Vaccination be Available for Homebound Individuals Eligible for a Booster Shot?
Content

Yes. In-home vaccination is available through the Health Department. Please call 410-313-6284 to schedule an appointment. 

Title
If we need a booster shot, does that mean that the vaccines aren’t working?
Content

No. COVID-19 vaccines are working well to prevent severe illness, hospitalization, and death, even against the variants. However, public health experts are starting to see reduced protection, especially among certain populations, against mild and moderate disease. The CDC recommends staying up-to-date with your vaccines by getting a booster shot, when eligible.

Title
When am I considered fully up to date on my COVID vaccinations?
Content

You are up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines when you have received all doses in the primary series and one booster when eligible, according to the CDC.

  • Getting a second booster is not necessary to be considered up to date at this time.
  • The recommendations will be different depending on your age, your health status, what vaccine you first received, and when you first got vaccinated.
Title
Are the booster shots different from the original vaccine?
Content

The Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson booster shots are identical to the original vaccine dose. The Moderna booster shot is half of the dose received during the initial vaccine series. The make-up of the vaccine is the same for all booster doses.

Title
Who is eligible for a Second Booster Shot?
Content

The CDC updated its recommendations so that Pfizer and Moderna second boosters are now recommended for adults age 50 and older and people age 12 and older who are moderately or severely immunocompromised who received an initial booster dose at least 4 months ago.

Separately and in addition, based on newly published data, adults who received a primary vaccine and booster dose of Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen COVID-19 vaccine at least 4 months ago should now receive a second booster dose using an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine.

Monoclonal Antibody Treatment
Title
What are monoclonal antibodies?
Content

Monoclonal antibodies are laboratory-made proteins to fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Although it is not a cure, treatment may lessen the severity of symptoms and help keep high-risk patients out of the hospital.

Title
How can I get monoclonal antibody treatment?
Content

Talk to your health care provider as soon as you test positive for COVID-19 or are aware that you have been exposed to COVID-19 so they can determine if monoclonal antibodies are the right treatment for you. They can provide a referral for treatment.

If you do not have a healthcare provider, you can contact eVisit to schedule a virtual appointment or complete a self-referral form. If it is determined you are eligible, you will be referred to an infusion site for treatment. If you do not have access to the internet you may call 410-649-6122 (Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.) to receive information on monoclonal applicability over the phone.

Title
Where is monoclonal antibody treatment being offered?
Content

There are dozens of facilities offering monoclonal antibody treatment in Maryland. Your healthcare provider, who can also refer you to a facility based on availability, may also have mAb treatment on hand.

Locations can also be found through the HHS website. Please note: this website may not reflect the most recent changes.

Title
Does monoclonal antibody treatment work?
Content

Clinical trials have shown fewer COVID-19-related hospitalizations or emergency room visits and a decrease in the amount of virus in an infected person’s blood in patients at high risk for developing severe COVID-19 symptoms. Clinical trials have also shown a decrease in severe disease and hospitalizations for unvaccinated persons who have been exposed to COVID-19. It is important to note that monoclonal antibodies are not a substitute for vaccination.

Title
Who is eligible for monoclonal antibody treatment?
Content

You may be eligible for monoclonal antibody treatment if you:

  • Recently tested positive for COVID-19 and have mild to moderate symptoms, or
  • Have recently been exposed to a known or suspected case of COVID-19 and meet the criteria below:

Monoclonal antibody treatment may be used in adults and adolescents (12 and older) who:

  • Recently had a positive COVID-19 test, whether or not you have been vaccinated against COVID-19
  • Are within 10 days of first experiencing symptoms
  • Do not need to be hospitalized for COVID-19 treatment
  • Weigh at least 88 pounds
  • Are in one of the following high-risk categories:
    • Are age 55 to 64 AND have cardiovascular disease, hypertension, chronic respiratory diseases or COPD
    • Have diabetes, obesity, kidney disease or other serious chronic conditions
    • Are 65 years old or older
    • Are pregnant
    • For adolescents: high BMI, sickle cell disease, heart disease, neurodevelopmental disorders, a medical-related technological dependence, asthma, or other chronic respiratory disease
    • Or who have been determined by their healthcare provider to be at high risk for worsening and/or hospitalization

You may also be eligible for monoclonal antibody treatment to prevent COVID-19. If you have been exposed in the past four days to a known or suspected case of COVID-19, have a significant medical condition, and are in one of the following categories, you may be eligible for treatment to prevent COVID-19:

  • Are not fully vaccinated
  • Are vaccinated but not expected to have an adequate immune response to the vaccine
  • Are in a congregate living situation such as a nursing home or prison
Title
How are monoclonal antibodies administered to COVID-19 patients?
Content

Patients receive monoclonal antibody treatment through a single IV infusion, followed by at least one hour of observation. In certain circumstances the monoclonal antibodies can be administered by injection under the skin (subcutaneous), particularly when IV is not possible.

Title
What are the side effects of monoclonal antibody treatment?
Content

The most common reported side effects are nausea and vomiting. Other side effects with bamlanivimab and etesevimab include diarrhea, dizziness, headache, and itchiness. Additional side effects with casirivimab/imdevimab (branded as REGEN-COV) include hyperglycemia and pneumonia. Additional side effects of sotrovimab include allergic reaction. Receiving any medicine by IV may cause brief pain, bleeding, bruising, soreness, swelling and infection where you get the needle.

Title
Will my insurance cover monoclonal antibody treatment?
Content

While monoclonal antibody treatment is free if you meet the requirements, there may be an administration fee or other associated costs related to the process of infusing the antibodies that may not be covered by insurance. Please check with your insurance provider.

Title
Can I get a COVID-19 vaccine if I have monoclonal antibody treatment?
Content

Those who have had monoclonal antibody treatment should wait 90 days before getting vaccinated.

Title
Is monoclonal antibody treatment effective against the new variants of COVID-19 that have emerged?
Content

Available monoclonal antibody therapy is expected to be effective against circulating variants, including delta.

Stay Connected!

Sign up for the County Executive's weekly newsletter and stay up to date on everything Howard County.
 

Zip Code