Zika Information for Pregnant Women

Zika virus can be passed from a pregnant woman to her fetus and can cause a serious birth defect of the brain called microcephaly in babies of women who have Zika virus while pregnant. Other problems have been found among fetuses and infants infected with Zika virus before birth, such as absent or poorly developed brain structures, defects of the eye, hearing deficits, and impaired growth. 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends special precautions for pregnant women. Women who are pregnant should not travel to areas with Zika. If you must travel to one of these areas or if you live in an area with Zika, talk to your healthcare provider and strictly follow steps to prevent mosquito bites and to prevent sexual transmission.

(Information provided by the CDC)

Zika and Sexual Transmission

It is possible for a man to carry Zika and give it to his partner(s) through sex, even when he does not have symptoms, or know that he is infected.The timeframe for using condoms or waiting to have sex will vary based on the couple’s situation and concerns and are listed below.  

  • Couples who include a man who has been diagnosed with Zika or had symptoms of Zika should consider using condoms or not having sex for at least 6 months after symptoms begin.  This includes men who live in and men who traveled to areas with Zika.
  • Couples who include a man who traveled to an area with Zika but did not develop symptoms of Zika should consider using condoms or not having sex for at least 8 weeks after their return.
  • Couples who include a man who lives in an area with Zika but has not developed symptoms of Zika should consider using condoms or not having sex while there is Zika in the area.